Advanced Education Programs for Experienced MSSPs

Every year after the national conference NAMSS receives a number of requests from attendees asking for a few more advanced sessions for experienced MSSPs. I believe, being a “seasoned” professional and all, that I’ve probably submitted that request myself a time or two over the years.

Sometimes the suggestion is made that we offer two tracks, advanced and beginner. Most attendees would select the advanced track, and in truth, that’s what the Conference Committee aims for when developing the content of the annual programs. Very few sessions are specifically designed for people new to the field.

I understand the request.  Each year I pick up a few tips and innovative ideas, but nothing ever quite matches the excitement I felt while attending my first couple of conferences; absorbing all that great information, meeting all those savvy people, and just being a part of this fascinating profession. 

So let’s stretch our minds and imaginations – the slate is blank.    Money is no object.  (I’ve always wanted to be able to say that!)  In fact, there are no limits at all - you have been asked to design the “perfect” NAMSS Conference for experienced MSSPs.  Your peers are looking to you for innovation, education, and a dash of fun. 

Click on the Comments link under this message and give us your best suggestions – we’re counting on you!

Fine print:
Although I am a member of the 2007 NAMSS Conference Committee, this informal poll is not authorized or sanctioned by NAMSS.  Opinions expressed here do not necessarily represent those of NAMSS, or any other organization for that matter. 
A small percentage of blog commenters have reported side-effects including tired eyes, sore wrists, and in extreme cases, an overwhelming desire to start a blog of their own.  Consider yourself warned.

Sentinel Events – Top Two Causes

Do you know the top two root causes for sentinel events in healthcare?  A mock surveyor from Joint Commission Resources stated in a meeting I attended today that upon analysis, JCAHO has determined that the top two factors are:

1.  Communication failure

2.  Poor employee orientation or ongoing training.

A sentinel event is defined as an unexpected occurrence involving death or serious physical or psychological injury, or the risk thereof.  They cause untold harm to patients, caregivers, and institutions.   

Medical Staff Standards – 2007 Prepublication Review and Comments

If you’re interested in the 2007 changes to the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) standards on medical staff credentialing and privileging  (and isn’t everyone??) citations and comments follow. 

(I KNOW Aggravated Doc Surg and Medpundit have been anxiously awaiting this update, being major JCAHO fans and all…)

I reviewed the prepublication medical staff standards (48 page pdf), compared them to the 2006 standards, and have done my best to capture the main points below.  I love being able to say things like “When MS.4.30, EP1 becomes effective in January 2008…”  What can I say? It’s a job hazard.

Although the wording of the standards pertaining to credentialing and privileging has been completely revised for 2007, it appears that the intent of the standards has not changed significantly. 

The Joint Commission continues to emphasize the need for data collection and review of evidence-based criteria when making decisions regarding both initial and ongoing practitioner privileging.

Citations are referenced by page number:

Page 3 of 48

Overview – Organized Medical Staff Structure

The organized medical staff is structured such that it has the ability to function in guiding and governing its members. The primary function of the organized medical staff is to approve and amend medical staff bylaws and to provide oversight for the quality of care, treatment, and services provided by practitioners with privileges.

There may be exceptions to the general requirement for a single medical staff… *Note that The Medicare Conditions of Participation require a single medical staff for each hospital (i.e. provider number.)

Page 7 of 48

MS.1.20 EP 19Note this element of performance is not effective at this time.

Page 13 of 48

MS.3.10 Elements of Performance

The word actively has been added to EP 2-9, i.e., The medical staff is actively involved in the measurement, assessment, and improvement of the following: Medical assessment and treatment of patients.

Page 14 of 48

MS.3.20 The organized medical staff participates in organization wide performance improvement activities.

There are major changes to the wording of Credentialing and Privileging MS.4.10 and MS.4.20:

Continue reading

Photos from the NAMSS Conference in Atlanta

Here are a few more photos from the NAMSS Conference held last week in Atlanta:
   
Carole La Pine, NAMSS President-Elect
   
Dan Thurmon flips for NAMSS!
 
Audience members unexpectedly become part of the show
   
Vicki Hitzges, Wednesday Keynote
   
Keith Harrell, Monday Keynote (photo from his website)
John Herringer from the Joint Commission Standards Interpretation Group reviewed 2007 JCAHO hospital standards
   
Dr. John Pigott from Tulane Hospital in New Orleans spoke along with Sue Westendorf on coping with disaster in healthcare
   
Rick Sheff and Vicki Searcy talked about certification and privileging
   
Advanced Practice Nurses and Physician Assistants – A Panel Discussion led by Chris Giles
   
Exploring Atalanta with fellow attendees
   
Attentive audiences
   

See more photos of the 2006 NAMSS Conference on the Alaska Association Medical Staff Professionals web site.

JASPER: Monster’s Job Assets & Strengths Profiler

Wondering whether you’re in the right job?  Monster.com, the Internet Job Search company, offers JASPER, a free, on line, interactive job assets and strengths profile test. Take it (10-15 minutes) and find out whether you are Traditional, Courageous, Innovative, Assertive, Empowering, or Diplomatic.   

Test results will also place you in one of nine “types” Thinker, Dynamo, Visionary, Motivator, Organizer, Mentor, Achiever, Individualist, or Advocate.

In addition, you’ll get info on your career stage, strengths and preferences, as well as tips on how to use the results to take action to improve your job fit.

Informative and fun; 15 minutes well-spent.

http://my.monster.com/JobStrengthProfile/Intro.aspx

NAMSS PreConference Sessions – Atlanta

I just returned from the 30th Annual NAMSS Conference & Exhibition held this year in Atlanta Georgia.  It was “super fantastic“; the main complaint I heard was that it was too difficult to choose from among all the excellent concurrent sessions. 

For those of you who rode in the airport shuttle with me this morning and wondered if I’d make it to my gate – I made it with a few minutes to spare.  : )  (Full shuttles and an early flight, I think I’ll have to plan that better next time.)

I took a few photos, some of which I’ll be posting here.  The first one is the view of Atlanta from my hotel window. 

Lynn Buchanan and Sheryl Deutch from Edge-U-Cate presented a great full day management session on Sunday.  I attended two excellent legal preconference sessions; the first, on the scary topic of negligent credentialing, was superbly handled by Barbara Blackmond of the healthcare law firm of Horty Springer in Pittsburgh, PA.

Ms. Blackmond has supplied her Powerpoint slides and some additional handouts that weren’t available in the session book.  Those handouts are available for free download here.

The afternoon legal session, although also on a serious topic, medical staff fair hearings, was presented with a bit of tongue-in-cheek humor by Catherine Ballard and Allen Killworth of the law firm of Bricker & Eckler from Columbus, OH.   

I was able to participate in the mock fair hearing as the Hearing Officer, although I must say it was difficult to assure that this group maintained any sort of appropriate legal decorum…

I took a few additional photos during the main conference, and will be posting some of those in the days to come.

If you weren’t able to attend, or just want to hear some of the sessions you missed, most of our speakers allowed us to record their sessions, and those can be ordered from JOB Conference Recording Services.

Recent Health News Stories of Note

Death after two-hour ER wait ruled homicide

A coroner’s jury has declared the death of a heart attack victim who spent almost two hours in the waiting room of Vista Medical Center in Waukegan, Illinois to be a homicide.

Beatrice Vance, 49, died of a heart attack, but the jury at a coroner’s inquest ruled Thursday that her death also was "a result of gross deviations from the standard of care that a reasonable person would have exercised in this situation."

http://www.cnn.com/2006/US/09/15/er.homicide.ap/index.html

Medpundit weighs in.

=========================================================

Surgeons’ experience counts as much as age study finds

"Surgeon age, young or old, should not be a primary factor when patients are making a choice for a surgeon," study co-author Dr. Jennifer F. Waljee, of the University of Michigan, told Reuters Health.

Instead, people facing an operation "should consider other factors, such as procedural volume, specialization, practice setting, and reputation when making their choices for providers," she added.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/conditions/08/29/surgeons.experience.reut/index.html

=========================================================

(This one is via Kevin, M.D.)

GP killed himself after ‘caring too much’

A doctor cared so much for his patients he took his own life when he feared he had let down an elderly woman in his care.

Mark Gradwell, 46, died from multiple injuries after being hit by a train yards from his home in Poynton, Cheshire (England).

http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/s/
223/223157_gp_killed_himself_after_caring_too_much.html

Flying this week? Check current TSA carry on restrictions

For those who are planning to travel by air to Atlanta for the NAMSS Conference next week, I checked the TSA web site this morning for the latest information on airline carry on restrictions.  The full list is here:
http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/prohibited/permitted-prohibited-items.shtm

Here’s what is listed with regard to food and drink:

Carry-on

Checked

All beverages

No

Yes

Baby formula and food, breast milk and other baby items – These are allowed in your carry-on baggage or personal items. You can take these through the security checkpoints and aboard your plane. However, you must be traveling with a baby or toddler. All items including formula or breast milk will be inspected.

Yes

Yes

Canned or jarred goods such as soup, sauces, peanut butter, fruits, vegetables and jellies No Yes

Cheese in pressurized containers

No

Yes

Duty free alcohol and other items

No

Yes

Gel based sports supplements

No

Yes

Jell-O’s

No

Yes

Pudding

No

Yes

Whipped cream

No

Yes

Yogurt or gel like food substances

No

Yes

Here is what is listed with regard to makeup and personal items:

Carry-on

Checked

Aerosol spray bottles and cans No Yes
All creams and lotions including Neosporin or first-aid creams and ointments, topical or rash creams and ointments, suntan lotions, moisturizers, etc. No Yes
Bubble bath balls, bath oils or moisturizers No Yes
Bug and mosquito sprays and repellents No Yes

Cigar Cutters

Yes

Yes

Corkscrews

Yes

Yes

Cuticle Cutters

Yes

Yes

Deodorants made of gel or aerosol No Yes
Eye drops – You are allowed to carry up to 4 oz., of eye drops with you. Volumes greater than 4 oz., are only permitted in your checked baggage. No Yes

Eyeglass Repair Tools – including screwdrivers.

Yes

Yes

Eyelash Curlers

Yes

Yes

Gel-filled bras and similar prosthetics – Gel-filled bras may be worn through security screening and aboard aircraft.

Yes

Yes

Hair styling gels and spray of all kinds including aerosol No Yes
Hair Straightener or Detangler No Yes

Knitting and Crochet Needles

Yes

Yes

Knives – except for plastic or round bladed butter knives.

No

Yes

Lip gels such as Carmex or Blistex No Yes

Liquid lip glosses or other liquids for lips

No

Yes

Liquid bubble bath including gel or liquid filled

No

Yes

Liquid foundations

No

Yes

Liquid, gel or spray perfumes and colognes

No

Yes

Liquid sanitizers

No

Yes

Liquid soaps

No

Yes

Liquid mascara

No

Yes

Make up removers or facial cleansers

No

Yes

Mouthwash

No

Yes

Nail Clippers

Yes

Yes

Nail Files

Yes

Yes

Nail polish and removers

No

Yes

Non-prescription liquid or gel medicines like cough syrup and gel cap type pills – Up to 4 oz. of essential non-prescription liquid medications.

Yes

Yes

Personal lubricants – Up to 4 oz. Yes Yes

Safety Razors – including disposable razors.

Yes

Yes

Saline solution – You are allowed to carry up to 4 oz., of eye drops with you. Volumes greater than 4 oz., are only permitted in your checked baggage.

No

Yes

Scissors – plastic or metal with blunt tips.

Yes

Yes

Scissors – metal with pointed tips and blades shorter than four inches in length.

Yes

Yes

Shampoos and conditioners

No

Yes

Toothpaste

No

Yes

Toy Transformer Robots

Yes

Yes

Toy Weapons – if not realistic replicas.

Yes

Yes

Tweezers

Yes

Yes

Umbrellas- allowed in carry-on baggage once they have been inspected to ensure that prohibited items are not concealed.

Yes

Yes

Walking Canes – allowed in carry-on baggage once they have been inspected to ensure that prohibited items are not concealed.

Yes

Yes

NOTE: Some personal care items containing aerosol are regulated as hazardous materials. The FAA regulates hazardous materials. This information is summarized at www.faa.gov.

Full list:
http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/prohibited/permitted-prohibited-items.shtm